Central Ohio Red Crossers Serving Families Suffering From Flooding in Minot, ND

Six central Ohio Red Crossers are currently in Minot, North Dakota helping families suffering from flooding there. Red Crossers from across the country have spent the summer helping folks suffering from wildfires, flooding and severe storms. Interested in helping the cause? Learn about volunteering and/or make a donation to the Disaster Relief Fund online. Your support is much appreciated!

Red Cross helps service families affected by Minot flood

Air Force Lt. Colonel James Lobash was already scheduled to return in late June for a needed break during his third deployment overseas to his hometown in Minot, North Dakota. The 2011 Minot flood, however, took that need to a whole new level.

 

In month seven of the deployment, his wife Nicole and six children were told to evacuate from their home. A neighbor helped her plug the sewer outlets into their home to prevent the raw sewage from backing up into their basement. Then she and her children left their home.

 

The Lobash family was among the more fortunate flood victims with only a couple of feet of water in their basement. Still, they will need to replace their water heater and probably their boiler. When Lt. Col Lobash arrived in country at the end of June, he met his family with relatives in Chicago and then came home to Minot to get his family back into their home before he had to return to his duty station.

 

The water system of the city of Minot had been contaminated, and all tap water had to be boiled before consumption. The Red Cross delivered bottled water to his neighborhood as he and his family worked on fixing the flood damage. “It may seem like a small thing, but really it was a big deal to us,” said Nicole. “I have six kids.”

 

Despite having relatively minimal damage to clean up, Lt. Col Lobash was running out of time. Lobash needed to get an extension to his leave, so he turned again to the Red Cross. It’s Disaster Relief operation was able to document the damage that had occurred to the Lobash home. This documentation is typically used by many of the Red Cross’s charitable partners, to allow them to more efficiently distribute aid to those directly affected by a disaster.

 

In this case, the Red Cross used this documentation to assist Lt. Col Lobash under its Service to Armed Forces program. A Red Cross Notification of Emergency was sent to the commander of his unit in Kabul Afghanistan, documenting the urgent need to allow Lobash to extend his leave to get his family back into their home.

 

The American Red Cross provides such emergency communications twenty-four hours a day, 365 days a year for military families experiencing a crisis. The Red Cross relays urgent messages containing accurate, factual, complete and verified descriptions of the emergency to service members stationed anywhere in the world, including ships at sea, embassies and remote locations.

 

Life is slowly returning to normal for the Lobash family. Their oldest 15 year old is currently encamped with the Civil Air Patrol. His mom said “He gets to be away from the mess right now, but we’ll have plenty of work for him when he gets home.”

 

Air Force Lt. Colonel James Lobash was already scheduled to return in late June for a needed break during his third deployment overseas to his hometown in Minot, North Dakota. The 2011 Minot flood, however, took that need to a whole new level.

 

In month seven of the deployment, his wife Nicole and six children were told to evacuate from their home. A neighbor helped her plug the sewer outlets into their home to prevent the raw sewage from backing up into their basement. Then she and her children left their home.

 

The Lobash family was among the more fortunate flood victims with only a couple of feet of water in their basement. Still, they will need to replace their water heater and probably their boiler. When Lt. Col Lobash arrived in country at the end of June, he met his family with relatives in Chicago and then came home to Minot to get his family back into their home before he had to return to his duty station.

 

The water system of the city of Minot had been contaminated, and all tap water had to be boiled before consumption. The Red Cross delivered bottled water to his neighborhood as he and his family worked on fixing the flood damage. “It may seem like a small thing, but really it was a big deal to us,” said Nicole. “I have six kids.”

 

Despite having relatively minimal damage to clean up, Lt. Col Lobash was running out of time. Lobash needed to get an extension to his leave, so he turned again to the Red Cross. It’s Disaster Relief operation was able to document the damage that had occurred to the Lobash home. This documentation is typically used by many of the Red Cross’s charitable partners, to allow them to more efficiently distribute aid to those directly affected by a disaster.

 

In this case, the Red Cross used this documentation to assist Lt. Col Lobash under its Service to Armed Forces program. A Red Cross Notification of Emergency was sent to the commander of his unit in Kabul Afghanistan, documenting the urgent need to allow Lobash to extend his leave to get his family back into their home.

 

The American Red Cross provides such emergency communications twenty-four hours a day, 365 days a year for military families experiencing a crisis. The Red Cross relays urgent messages containing accurate, factual, complete and verified descriptions of the emergency to service members stationed anywhere in the world, including ships at sea, embassies and remote locations.

 

Life is slowly returning to normal for the Lobash family. Their oldest 15 year old is currently encamped with the Civil Air Patrol. His mom said “He gets to be away from the mess right now, but we’ll have plenty of work for him when he gets home.”

 

Thanks to the Red Cross Blog and Bill Fitler, Red Cross worker in North Dakota for this story.

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